Monthly Archives: September 2015

Keep Your Gut Happy With Dried Plums

Rodale News
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Dried plums (aka the fruit formerly known as prunes) are best known for being a high-fiber food that helps you "go." Now research has discovered a new way this sweet fruit keeps your bowels happy: According to research presented at the Experimental Biology 2015 conference, dried plums may reduce your risk of colon cancer by feeding your good gut bacteria.

More: Lower Your Risk for Colon Cancer by up to 43 Percent

In an animal model, the researchers discovered that dried plums promote the retention of positive bacteria in the colon. Disruptions of healthy gut bacteria in the colon can lead to inflammation, which has previously been shown to promote the development of colon cancer.

"Our research explored the potential cancer-protective properties of dried plums using a well-established rat model of colon cancer," says Nancy Turner, PhD, Texas A&M AgriLife Research professor at Texas A&M University. "Dried plums contain phenolic compounds, which have multiple effects on our health, including their ability to serve as antioxidants that can neutralize the oxidant effect of free radicals that can damage our DNA."

Add more dried plums into your diet with this recipe for Quinoa and Butternut Breakfast Bowl from Total Health Turnaround by Tricia Pingel, NMD.

Quinoa and Butternut Breakfast Bowl

Ingredients:
1 cup quinoa, rinsed and drained
1 1/3 cups coconut milk beverage
2 cups peeled, chopped butternut squash
1 cup shredded carrots
4 teaspoons ground flaxseeds
3 Tablespoons maple syrup
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/8 teaspoon ground allspice
1/2 cup chopped dried plums
Stevia
1/4 cup toasted walnuts
1 1/2 cups fresh blueberries

Directions:
In a medium saucepan, combine the quinoa, coconut milk, squash, carrots, flaxseed, maple syrup, cinnamon, and allspice. Bring to a simmer and cook, covered, for 20 minutes. Add the plums during the last 5 minutes of cooking. Stir in stevia, to taste, and top with the walnuts. Serve with the blueberries. Makes 4 servings.

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Keep Your Bowels Happy With This Sweet Treat

Rodale News
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Dried plums (aka the fruit formerly known as prunes) are best known for being a high-fiber food that—ahem—helps you go. Now research has discovered a new way this sweet fruit keeps your bowels happy: According to research presented at the Experimental Biology 2015 conference, dried plums may reduce your risk of colon cancer by feeding your good gut bacteria [link].

More: Lower Your Risk for Colon Cancer by up to 43 Percent

In an animal model, the researchers discovered that dried plums promote the retention of positive bacteria in the colon. Disruptions of healthy gut bacteria in the colon can lead to inflammation, which has previously been shown to promote the development of colon cancer.

"Our research explored the potential cancer-protective properties of dried plums using a well-established rat model of colon cancer," says Nancy Turner, PhD, Texas A&M AgriLife Research professor at Texas A&M University. "Dried plums contain phenolic compounds, which have multiple effects on our health, including their ability to serve as antioxidants that can neutralize the oxidant effect of free radicals that can damage our DNA."

Add more dried plums into your diet with this recipe for Quinoa and Butternut Breakfast Bowl from Total Health Turnaround by Tricia Pingel, NMD.

Quinoa and Butternut Breakfast Bowl
Makes 4 servings

Ingredients:
1 cup quinoa, rinsed and drained

1 1/3 cups coconut milk beverage

2 cups peeled, chopped butternut squash

1 cup shredded carrots

4 teaspoons ground flaxseeds

3 Tablespoons maple syrup

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1/8 teaspoon ground allspice

½ cup chopped dried plums

Stevia

¼ cup toasted walnuts

1½ cups fresh blueberries

Directions:
In a medium saucepan, combine the quinoa, coconut milk, squash, carrots, flaxseed, maple syrup, cinnamon, and allspice. Bring to a simmer and cook, covered, for 20 minutes. Add the plums during the last 5 minutes of cooking. Stir in stevia, to taste, and top with the walnuts. Serve with the blueberries.

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The Real Reason Why ClassPass Works So Well

Rodale News
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Are you constantly complaining about doing the same old exercise routine, day-in and day-out? Well turns out, mixing things up won't only make you less bored, but it'll also make you more obedient with your exercise. Translation? ClassPass, the popular monthly membership that lets users choose to take classes at hundreds of studios, has the right idea.

A new study out of the journal Psychology & Health followed women ages 18 to 45 years as they were randomly assigned to complete 30-minutes of either the uncommon or common exercise stimulus. According to researchers, participants who completed an uncommon bout of aerobic exercise reported more favorable affect post-exercise, as well as stronger intentions for future exercise, compared to participants who completed a common bout of aerobic exercise.

More: 6 Strategies to Beat Off Workout Boredom

So what's this mean for you? Good things, we promise. If you haven't been mixing up your workouts, now is as good of a time as any to try new things. If you're not in a major city where services like ClassPass are offered (other popular alternatives are FitReserve and Athletes Club) then simple pick different days of the week to try new activities. A barre-based class on Mondays, a run on Tuesday, rest on Wednesday, a high-intensity interval training class on Thursday, and yoga on Friday. Trust us, with a schedule like that, not only will you stave boredom–but you'll also see more results. 

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